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Is The Ford GT The All-American Supercar We’ve Been Waiting For?


The Ford GT is designed as a race car first and foremost, but does this compromise it as a road car?
It’s been an agonisingly long wait for the new road-going Ford GT after the last model was discontinued in 2006. By now you’ve probably already seen Matt LeBlanc’s glowing review of the GT which aired on Top Gear a few weeks ago, but now the embargo has lifted and the press reviews have been pouring in. Like the original car in the 1960s, the Ford GT was primarily built as a race car first and foremost. To find out if this compromises it as a road car, Autocar’s Matt Prior tested the hotly-anticipated supercar on twisty mountain roads to see how it stacks up.
As a track car, the Ford GT doesn’t disappoint. But then, this shouldn’t be surprising considering the GT’s established racing heritage. We all know the story of how the original GT debuted at Le Mans in 1966 and humiliated Ferrari, finishing in first, second and third place, before winnig the championship three-years running.

Is The Ford GT The All-American Supercar We’ve Been Waiting For?
50 years later, history repeated itself as Ford built a new GT to dominate Le Mans, which won the series last year. With a top speed of 216 mph, the new GT is the fastest production car Ford has ever built, thanks to its twin-turbo 3.5-liter V6 that produces 647 hp, helping the supercar go from 0-60 mph in 2.8 seconds. Advanced active aerodynamics also help keep the supercar stable at speed: the rear wing automatically deploys at certain speeds to create more downforce and acts as an air brake, extending under heavy braking. Activate track mode, and the active dynamics system keeps it planted, lowering the ride height and increasing the spring rate.
Is The Ford GT The All-American Supercar We’ve Been Waiting For?
It’s clear, then, that the Ford GT is designed as an uncompromising race car for the road – the carbon fiber tub even has an integrated rollcage. But does this compromise it as a road car compared to the 2005 Ford GT before it? We’ll let you watch Autocar’s verdict to find out.
Is The Ford GT The All-American Supercar We’ve Been Waiting For?

 

Kawasaki Z650 vs. Suzuki SV650 vs. Yamaha FZ-07 – COMPARISON TEST

00:1401:24

Have a little mercy on the design teams responsible for the Kawasaki Z650, SuzukiSV650, and Yamaha FZ-07. To leave a mark on the middleweight-twins category, a bike has to be everything from new-rider friendly to sporty enough for riders with a few years under the belt. The bike has to be stylish but cost-effective (which is not to be confused with cheap), comfortable but not too relaxed. Oh, by the way, if it under-delivers in any one category, then there’s a similarly styled option right behind it that’ll gladly take over the top spot—and probably for a few less dollars. Consider failing to hit the right marks the equivalent of ushering potential customers onto the competition’s showroom floor. No pressure, team.

Kawasaki Z650, Suzuki SV650, Yamaha FZ-07 on-road action

Kawasaki Z650 vs. Suzuki SV650 vs. Yamaha FZ-07

Jeff Allen

Since its 2015 model-year unveil, Yamaha’s FZ-07 has missed the fewest marks. It’s toppled Suzuki’s Gladius-turned-SFV650 and even outshined Kawasaki’s otherwise successful Ninja 650. In a class where you have to be a wide range of things to an even wider range of enthusiasts, the FZ-07 has been the most affordable, flexible, and fun option. With their new SV650 and Z650, have the Suzuki and Kawasaki design teams done enough to close the gap? We rendezvoused at the Cycle World office and then chased blue skies toward Borrego Springs—via a mix of highway and flowing back roads—to find out.

Kawasaki Z650 on-road action

2017 Kawasaki Z650

Jeff Allen

Kawasaki Z650

UPS DOWNS
Low seat height Least hp and torque
Admirable fit & finish Too much vibration
Decent suspension feel Awkward ergonomics

The 2017 Z650 is Kawasaki’s attempt at satisfying the throng of naked-bike fans left hanging when it pulled the ER-6n from the US lineup in 2011. Introduced alongside the fully faired Ninja 650, this bike jettisons Kawasaki’s traditional double-pipe perimeter frame for a lighter-weight trellis-style frame. The engine is updated with smaller, 36mm throttle bodies. There’s a new assist and slipper clutch, a glitzy gauge cluster with gear-position indicator, and ABS is optional (our testbike came so equipped).

Fit and finish is admirable, though the Z650’s look never really caught the eye of our testers, who were drawn to the less-aggressive lines of the SV650 or more modern-looking FZ-07. Personal opinion, yes, but as a whole, that kind of sums up the Z650. It attempts to strike a middle ground between the straightforward and classic SV650 and sportier FZ-07. Only, in doing so, it fails to be better than either bike. The engine has more midrange grunt than Kawasaki twins of yesteryear thanks to the new throttle bodies, but past 4,500 rpm, it also generates enough vibration in the seat, handlebar, and footpegs that any amount of commuting seems laborious. Overall gearing feels short, and the bike produces the least power of the trio (59.9 hp at 7,960 rpm).

Kawasaki Z650 static 3/4 view

2017 Kawasaki Z650

Jeff Allen

Our test riders covered the height gamut, but none could come to grips with the Z’s ergonomics. This is spoiled by a seat that feels even lower than it is (seat height is an admirable 30.6 inches), an overly narrow handlebar that feels high by comparison, and a tank that widens where your knees rest. A 41mm KYB fork and preload-adjustable shock have a smoother action than the suspension on the SV650 or FZ-07, though overall handling is heavier than the FZ and front-end feel is limited at corner entry. At 414 pounds (wet, with ABS), Kawasaki has done a good job of keeping the bike light, but it’s still no less than 10 pounds more than an FZ-07.

In a category where bikes are so closely matched, you can’t afford to give anything up. With its awkward ergos and extra vibration, the Z650 quickly fell behind the SV650 and FZ-07 and by midday was the bike we were least excited to climb back on.

Suzuki SV650 on-road wheelie action

2017 Suzuki SV650

Jeff Allen

Suzuki SV650

UPS DOWNS
Classic looks Carries a little extra weight
Narrow tank/seat junction Seat can start to feel firm
Great intake/exhaust noise Front brakes lack good power

Suzuki’s middleweight-twins platform has borne some rather uninspiring models since the move from SV650 to Gladius to SFV650. With its 2017 SV650, Suzuki promises a return to the platform’s roots. An updated V-twin engine has no fewer than 60 new parts for more power, while a reworked steel frame contributes to a claimed 15-pound (!) weight savings over the outgoing SFV. Add in a fuel tank that’s 2.5 inches narrower than the SFV’s tank, optional ABS (omitted on our test model), Suzuki’s one-push easy-start system, and low-rpm assist feature, and you have a bike that, from a spec-sheet perspective, finally does the SV name proud.

Parked alongside the Z650 and FZ-07 at breakfast on a crisp Southern California morning, the Suzuki appears simple and modest in design. Clean. I ask the group what they think about the muted lines and the simple stripe running the length of the fuel tank, to which they reply—almost surprisingly—with kudos. Sometimes it’s okay to not over-engineer a motorcycle, which is what Suzuki has done, from the outside in.

Suzuki SV650 static side view

2017 Suzuki SV650

Jeff Allen

The SV650’s mellowed yet relatable charm is more apparent on the road. It’s not the lightest-handling bike in the group, but it’s the most stable, predictable, and planted on a twisting canyon road and feels totally refined. It’s the only bike that won’t tickle your extremities with vibrations at 5,000 rpm and beyond, and its ergos are the most comfortable, the wider handlebar and narrow tank/seat junction offering up a good feeling of control. Like every other Suzuki middleweight-twin, it does everything without fuss—in the end providing the confidence needed to make newer riders feel comfortable. To ride better. Safer. Confidently.

The SV makes more peak power than the FZ-07 but less torque (44.2 pound-feet at 8,000 rpm versus 46.3 pound-feet at 6,290 rpm). As we work our way into and out of the quiet oasis that is Santa Ysabel, I notice how the SV650 is less willing to jump off the line at a stop. It’s a trait that would’ve earned it extra criticisms back in the mess that is LA traffic but goes mostly unnoticed here. The bike makes lots of great exhaust/intake noises and fueling is the smoothest, by comparison.

That polished feel, mixed with comfortable ergos, good peak power, and reduced vibration, leads to better feel on the highway, and of the group, the SV feels like the best commuter bike. It’s not quite as exciting as the FZ-07, but it is an overall great package nonetheless.

Yamaha FZ-07 on-road action

2017 Yamaha FZ-07

Jeff Allen

Yamaha FZ-07

UPS DOWNS
Third-gear wheelies! Tallest seat height
Big fun, small package Soft suspension
Nimble handling Extra steps to reset trip

Third-gear wheelies.

I could leave our thoughts on the FZ-07 at that, though it would hardly do the FZ-07 platform justice. Because while the FZ-07 is more entertaining than any affordable, mid-level bike to come before it (and does indeed do third-gear wheelies with relative ease), it’s also a very well-rounded motorcycle that doesn’t overlook newer riders. For 2017, that’s even more true, Yamaha finally updating the platform with ABS.

Our bike is a non-ABS 2016 model and tipped the Cycle World scales at just 401 pounds, ultimately putting Suzuki’s 429-pound non-ABS SV650 to shame (Yamaha and Suzuki claim 403 pounds and 434 pounds for their ABS models, respectively). Steering is as quick as those figures suggest, the FZ-07 tipping in to a corner with less effort and transitioning from side to side with an adeptness the SV or Z650 could only hope to have. Throttle out of the corner and it shines again, with enough low-end power to easily gap the competition by one or two bike lengths.

Yamaha FZ-07 static side view

2017 Yamaha FZ-07

Jeff Allen

The engine’s broader range of power makes it more flexible and, in turn, makes shifting more of an option than a requirement. There are more vibes than the Suzuki at the handlebar but significantly less than the Z650.

Despite the FZ-07 steering so quickly it never feels twitchy. Suspension is balanced front to rear, though overall rates feel soft and allow the bike to move around when you’re not smooth with your inputs. Brakes carry the performance-minded torch, the FZ-07’s stoppers offering up more power and feel as we worked our way down a beautifully twisty section of road, toward Southern California’s barren desert floor.

Back on the super slab, the FZ-07 surprises with a rider triangle that’s comfortable enough for bigger riders. The saddle is as thin as the Suzuki’s (both start to feel hard after about 60 miles) but much flatter, which keeps you from sliding up in to the tank—all good so long as you can deal with the taller, 31.8-inch seat height. Speaking of tanks, the FZ has the smallest of the group, at 3.7 gallons, but with superb fuel mileage numbers, that was a non-issue. Even if it was, the question remains: Is riding a motorcycle about smiles per gallon or miles per gallon?

Kawasaki Z650, Suzuki SV650, Yamaha FZ-07 static group

Kawasaki Z650 vs. Suzuki SV650 vs. Yamaha FZ-07

Jeff Allen

FINAL THOUGHTS

To us, riding motorcycles is supposed to be fun. The best ones—the ones that make a lasting impact on the industry—manage to be that while still tailoring the experience toward the intended consumer, which in this case means everyone from new riders to returning riders to commuters to the guy attending the occasional trackday.

The SV outshines the Z650 through a more refined feel that makes it a great option for the everyday rider. And yet the FZ-07 outdoes both, ultimately turning each ride into a new and exciting experience. It’s as capable as it is user-friendly. Fun as it is pretty. Put simply, Yamaha’s design team knocked this one out of the park. Pressure: off, at least for now.

Kawasaki Z650 studio side view

2017 Kawasaki Z650

Courtesy of Kawasaki

SPECIFICATIONS
Price $7399
Dry weight 390 lb.
Wheelbase 55.7 in.
Seat height 30.6 in.
Fuel mileage 47 mpg
1/4 mile 12.41 sec. @ 102.96 mph
0–60 mph 3.5 sec.
Top gear 40–60 mph 3.2 sec.
60–80 mph 3.8 sec.
Horsepower 59.9 @ 7960 rpm
Torque 43.6 lb.-ft. @ 6620 rpm
Braking 30–0 mph 33 ft.
60–0 mph 132 ft.
Suzuki SV650 studio side view

2017 Suzuki SV650

Courtesy of Suzuki

SPECIFICATIONS
Price $6999 ($7499 w/ ABS)
Dry weight 406 lb.
Wheelbase 57.2 in.
Seat height 31.2 in.
Fuel mileage 48 mpg
1/4 mile 12.06 sec. @ 108.91 mph
0–60 mph 3.3 sec.
Top gear 40–60 mph 3.7 sec.
60–80 mph 4.3 sec.
Horsepower 69.3 @ 8530 rpm
Torque 44.2 lb.-ft. @ 8000 rpm
Braking 30–0 mph 34 ft.
60–0 mph 139 ft.
Yamaha FZ-07 studio side view

2017 Yamaha FZ-07

Courtesy of Yamaha

SPECIFICATIONS
Price $7199 ($7499 w/ ABS)*
Dry weight 379 lb.
Wheelbase 55.4 in.
Seat height 31.8 in.
Fuel mileage 51 mpg
1/4 mile 12.02 sec. @ 107.93 mph
0–60 mph 3.3 sec.
Top gear 40–60 mph 3.3 sec.
60–80 mph 3.9 sec.
Horsepower 66.7 @ 8820 rpm
Torque 46.3 lb.-ft. @ 6290 rpm
Braking 30–0 mph 34 ft.
60–0 mph 136 ft.

SPECIFICATIONS COMPARED

Kawasaki Z650 Suzuki SV650 Yamaha FZ-07
Price $7399 $6999 ($7499 w/ ABS) $7199 ($7499 w/ ABS)*
Dry weight 390 lb. 406 lb. 379 lb.
Wheelbase 55.7 in. 57.2 in. 55.4 in.
Seat height 30.6 in. 31.2 in. 31.8 in.
Fuel mileage 47 mpg 48 mpg 51 mpg
1/4 mile 12.41 sec. @ 102.96 mph 12.06 sec. @ 108.91 mph 12.02 sec. @ 107.93 mph
0–60 mph 3.5 sec. 3.3 sec. 3.3 sec.
Top gear 40–60 mph 3.2 sec. 3.7 sec. 3.3 sec.
60–80 mph 3.8 sec. 4.3 sec. 3.9 sec.
Horsepower 59.9 @ 7960 rpm 69.3 @ 8530 rpm 66.7 @ 8820 rpm
Torque 43.6 lb.-ft. @ 6620 rpm 44.2 lb.-ft. @ 8000 rpm 46.3 lb.-ft. @ 6290 rpm
Braking 30–0 mph 33 ft. 34 ft. 34 ft.
60–0 mph 132 ft. 139 ft. 136 ft.

QUICK SIDEBAR:

KTM 690 Duke studio side view

KTM 690 Duke

Courtesy of KTM

Single and Ready to Mingle
KTM’s latest 690 Duke has an LC4 engine with second counterbalancer for reduced vibration and a 1,000-rpm-wider rev range for even more single-cylinder fun. Add a slick TFT dash and you have a bike that’s part commuter, part hooligan.


MORE FROM CW BUYER’S GUIDE:

A 2017 Kawasaki Z650

2017 KAWASAKI Z650

Check out the CW Buyer’s Guide for all the specifications such as price, weight, displacement, seat height, and much more.

A 2017 Suzuki SV650

2017 SUZUKI SV650

Check out the CW Buyer’s Guide for all the specifications such as price, weight, displacement, seat height, and much more.

A 2017 Yamaha FZ-07

2017 YAMAHA FZ-07

Check out the CW Buyer’s Guide for all the specifications such as price, weight, displacement, seat height, and much more.

via: cycleworld.com

Audi e-Tron Sportback Will Take On The Jaguar I-Pace In 2019

Prices will start at $70,000, which could also make it a worthy rival to the Tesla Model X.
At last month’s Shanghai Auto Show, Audi unveiled the e-Tron Sportback Concept, an electric coupe-style crossover set to rival the Jaguar I-Pace. Essentially, it represented Audi’s vision of what its customers will be driving in the future to meet the rapidly rising demand for crossovers and EVs. According to Automotive News, executives have now confirmed that the production version of the e-tron Sportback will be arriving in the US in 2019. Yes, that’s one year after the Jaguar I-Pace, which is already playing catch-up with the Tesla Model X.
Audi e-Tron Sportback Will Take On The Jaguar I-Pace In 2019
The production model will be based on Audi’s heavily modified MLB Evo architecture, which is shared with the A4, A5, Q5, and Q7. A variety of electric powertrain options will be available with the range-topping model producing 500 horsepower, positioning the e-tron Sportback as a high-performance, premium electric SUV. This makes it similar to the 496-hp concept model previewed at Shanghai, which also means it should be capable of hitting 0-62 mph in 4.6 seconds. While we expected the production model to look more conventional than the concept, Autonews reports that the concept’s styling “closely reflects the upcoming production car.”
Audi e-Tron Sportback Will Take On The Jaguar I-Pace In 2019
Like the concept, the production model will be equipped with an abundance of futuristic technology including exterior cameras OLED interior screens replacing the conventional rearview mirrors. Prices will start at around $70,000. That’s around $20,000 more than an entry-level Q7, but about the same as the Tesla Model X which starts at $74,000. While the e-tron Sportback won’t be ready until 2019, Audi will be relying on the e-Tron quattro to go head-to-head with the Jaguar I-Pace in 2018, a similarly sized crossover with a more conventional roofline and a slightly more spacious interior. It was first previewed by the e-tron Quattro Concept in 2015, but will look similar to the e-Tron Sportback.
Audi e-Tron Sportback Will Take On The Jaguar I-Pace In 2019
Audi e-Tron Sportback Will Take On The Jaguar I-Pace In 2019
Audi e-Tron Sportback Will Take On The Jaguar I-Pace In 2019

 

820-HP Kevlar-Bodied BMW M2 Uses Chevy V8 To Execute Set After Set Of Tires

Watch it commit unspeakable atrocities to this set of rear rubbers.
Not like it’s hard to misconstrue the entire point of a custom build when it’s facing you at a sideways angle with tire smoke pouring out of the rear wheel wells, but there is legitimately more to this custom BMW M2 build than initially meets the eye. Theatrics aside, it pays to get up close and personal with HGK’s “Eurofighter,” and thankfully there’s a Speedhunters article on the build we found via Jalopnik. In it, we learn that the strange looking body panels are actually kevlar.
It’s what’s under the hood, though, that’s most impressive because in lieu of the 3.0-liter turbocharged straight-six, famed drift car tuner HGK went with a small block Chevy V8 engine. Without any forced induction meddling, the engine makes a total of 820 horsepower at 7,000 rpm and a staunch 678 lb-ft of torque.

820-HP Kevlar-Bodied BMW M2 Uses Chevy V8 To Execute Set After Set Of Tires
Even without a flat turbo torque curve, there’s at least 590 lb-ft available from 4,000 RPM, but thanks to the unimpeded roar of the engine, you’d be forgiven for spending plenty of time close to the 8,000 rpm redline. Power still goes to the rear, which is obvious when you consider that this car is built to be judge, jury, and inevitable executioner to its set of rear tires. Its appetite for tire smoke is easily satiated by the engine’s power output alone, but being built to Formula Drift standards, it has to compete too, which is why clever weight management has helped this M2 tip the scales at only 2,645 pounds. In short, this thing is a one-off piece of enviable magic. We’re even lucky to get a taste like this.
820-HP Kevlar-Bodied BMW M2 Uses Chevy V8 To Execute Set After Set Of Tires
820-HP Kevlar-Bodied BMW M2 Uses Chevy V8 To Execute Set After Set Of Tires
 via carbuzz.com

This Is The Only Orange Ferrari Enzo In The World And It Is Badass

First time Ferrari buyers almost always opt for the classic shade of Rosso Corsa red. And understandably so. But there are plenty of other hues to choose from, while those with deep enough pockets or enough influence can request that Maranello whips up a color all of their own. Apart from pink. That particular color is strictly forbidden. As a Ferrari Australasia’s CEO put it: It’s a brand rule. No Pink. No Pokemon Ferraris!” Which, we have to say, is a comforting thought.
This Is The Only Orange Ferrari Enzo In The World And It Is Badass
Synonymous with McLarens and the occasional Lamborghini, orange isn’t a color you’d normally associate with the Prancing Horse, but as this exquisite example of a Ferrari Enzo proves, should be used more often. Formerly known as Rosso Dino, Ferrari allowed a single Enzo to be coated in the unique shade and we think it looks spectacular. If you agree and you have a few million dollars squirreled away, then Ferrari of Newport Beach has the car for sale priced at $3.7 million. According to the car’s description, Rosso Dino was a dormant vintage Ferrari color, a non-metallic paint named after Enzo’s son Dino, which the factory agreed to apply to the Enzo.
This Is The Only Orange Ferrari Enzo In The World And It Is Badass
The 2003 example was originally painted in this vibrant shade of Rosso Dino, and its only owner managed to clock just 3,611 miles in the 14 years he’s been driving it. The interior is finished in black leather with carbon-fiber trim, it rides on 19-inch alloys and power comes from the legendary 6.0-liter V12 rated at 660 hp and 485 lb-ft of torque mated to a manual six-speed transmission with steering-wheel mounted shifters. This is an absolute peach of a car and one that deserves to be a part of a loving collection.
This Is The Only Orange Ferrari Enzo In The World And It Is Badass
This Is The Only Orange Ferrari Enzo In The World And It Is Badass
This Is The Only Orange Ferrari Enzo In The World And It Is Badass
This Is The Only Orange Ferrari Enzo In The World And It Is Badass
This Is The Only Orange Ferrari Enzo In The World And It Is Badass
This Is The Only Orange Ferrari Enzo In The World And It Is Badass
This Is The Only Orange Ferrari Enzo In The World And It Is Badass
This Is The Only Orange Ferrari Enzo In The World And It Is Badass
This Is The Only Orange Ferrari Enzo In The World And It Is Badass
This Is The Only Orange Ferrari Enzo In The World And It Is Badass
This Is The Only Orange Ferrari Enzo In The World And It Is Badass

 

Someone Needs To Drop $2.6 Million For This Lamborghini Sesto Elemento

Included in the deal is the chance to make this the only street-legal Sesto Elemento, for a price of course.
It translates to the “Sixth Element” in English, and only 20 examples were ever built. The Lamborghini Sesto Elemento is the track-only, carbon-fiber rich, V10-powered extreme machine that debuted back in 2010 at the Paris Motor Show. And now just one of those 20 is for sale, listed on James Edition through Dubai-based Knight International. This one is, like all of them, a 2011 model. Not at all surprisingly it’s in factory condition and has zero (yes, “0”) miles on its clock.
Someone Needs To Drop $2.6 Million For This Lamborghini Sesto Elemento
Its naturally aspirated 5.2-liter V10 is good for 570 hp and 400 lb-ft of torque, with power transferred to all four wheels through a six-speed automatic with paddle shifters. Carbon fiber is the material of choice for the body, chassis, drive shaft and many suspension components. Total weight is only 2,202 pounds. Acceleration, as you’d expect, is nuts. Zero to 60 mph happens in a mere 2.5 seconds and top speed is over 210 mph. These pictures also reveal its bare, race car-influenced interior, sans air conditioning and stereo system. Even the seats are made of a foam-like material and are bolted directly onto the chassis.
This particular Sesto Elemento was originally bought for 3 million Euros, but the asking price is now 2,400,000 Euros, or around $2.615 million. What’s equally interesting and tempting is that Knight International is offering to do a street legal conversion, in collaboration with a “high profile engineering firm,” that would effectively produce the only street legal Lamborghini Sesto Elemento in the entire world. Only serious buyers will be given the time of day, of course. Photos courtesy of Knight International/James Edition.
Someone Needs To Drop $2.6 Million For This Lamborghini Sesto Elemento
Someone Needs To Drop $2.6 Million For This Lamborghini Sesto Elemento
Someone Needs To Drop $2.6 Million For This Lamborghini Sesto Elemento
Someone Needs To Drop $2.6 Million For This Lamborghini Sesto Elemento
Someone Needs To Drop $2.6 Million For This Lamborghini Sesto Elemento
Someone Needs To Drop $2.6 Million For This Lamborghini Sesto Elemento
Someone Needs To Drop $2.6 Million For This Lamborghini Sesto Elemento
Someone Needs To Drop $2.6 Million For This Lamborghini Sesto Elemento

 

10 Cheap Ways To Make Your Car Go Faster

How to get supercar performance on a budget.
Modern performance cars come so well-tuned from the factory these days, finding hidden horsepower can be like squeezing blood from a stone. But, for many first-time car owners and weekend warriors, the challenge isn’t to get more from an already fast car, it’s to unlock the potential of the more practical vehicle that’s available to you. That’s something that has brought car folks together for generations. Try these ten suggestions to tap into the well of performance you knew was hiding under the surface of your daily driver or 24-hours-of-lemons competitor.
10 Cheap Ways To Make Your Car Go Faster
Lower It Achieving a low center of gravity will allow your car to corner more quickly. Lowering springs can be had for just about any car these days, and you can probably do the entire operation for under $500 installed.
10 Cheap Ways To Make Your Car Go Faster
Change Your Air Filter If you’ve never checked on the condition of your car’s air filter, now is a good time. Allowing these important components to become caked with dirt and debris can keep your engine from breathing, that means less power. Swapping in a high-performance filter will increase MPG and make your car more powerful.
10 Cheap Ways To Make Your Car Go Faster
Ice Bags for the Win! This is not what you’d call a long-term power adder, but it’s a move that drag racers have been employing for decades, and it works. Drop a few bags of ice on your intake to shave a tenth or two off the old e.t. Never fails.
10 Cheap Ways To Make Your Car Go Faster
Add Lightness Colin Chapman started Lotus, and his philosophy is one of the truest in racing. A lighter car will always be a more responsive car, so if you’re not using those extra seats, body panels or radio, get rid of ‘em. Trust us, you’ll feel the difference at the track.
10 Cheap Ways To Make Your Car Go Faster
Boost It! Now, this is not an upgrade that can be had quite as cheaply as gutting your car or relieving it of some extra seat weight, but there are few upgrades that will deliver more power for your money. Forced induction on the cheap means lots of ponies, more than any other single upgrade. Just make sure you’ve got the proper enlarged fuel injectors to match your new boost.
10 Cheap Ways To Make Your Car Go Faster
Re-Tire That Thing The things tire manufacturers can do with rubber compounds these days shouldn’t even be allowed on a racetrack. If your car is sporting rubber more than a few years old, it’s likely dried out and not sticky anyway. Upgrade to modern tires for improved traction and a quicker car.
10 Cheap Ways To Make Your Car Go Faster
Short-Throw Shifter Here’s an upgrade that will actually change the feel from the driver’s seat. You can find short-throw shift kits for most manual transmission cars. They’ll reduce the distance your shifter must travel to find a gear, and that means valuable tenths back to you.
10 Cheap Ways To Make Your Car Go Faster
Programmers and Chips Every modern car’s ignition and timing is controlled using a computer these days. You can take advantage of that by making tweaks that come pre-configured in a performance chip or fuel map. Got a boosted car? That means even more gains to be had.
10 Cheap Ways To Make Your Car Go Faster
Exhaust System Upgrades Unless you live in California where all upgrades that make cars louder than factory are deemed illegal these days, you can install a new exhaust system to give your car a more aggressive sound and free it from restrictive factory plumbing.
10 Cheap Ways To Make Your Car Go Faster
Throttle Body Your throttle body is the inlet to your car’s intake manifold: it’s what your engine breaths through. You can replace the stock unit with a larger one to increase airflow. More air, more fuel, more power — it’s that simple, and these tend to be very affordable.

 

Watch Godzilla Get Annihilated By An Audi R8 V10 Plus

Poor Godzilla has been defeated by an Audi. Again.
The once mighty Godzilla has taken a serious beating in drag races lately. After being humiliated by an Audi RS6, which in fairness is astonishingly fast for a wagon, the guys over at Car Magazine have given the GT-R a second chance by pitting it against Audi’s current flagship sports car, the R8 V10 Plus. On paper, the GT-R should be quicker than the R8 V10 Plus. The GT-R Black Edition featured in the showdown has 562 horsepower and significantly more torque than the Audi at 470 lb-ft, allowing it to sprint from 0-62 mph in around 2.9 seconds.
The Audi R8 V10 Plus, on the other hand, has more horsepower than the GT-R at 601 hp but less torque at 413 lb-ft, resulting in a 0-62 mph time of about 3.2 seconds. Initially, the GT-R predictably launches off the line faster, but it doesn’t take long for the R8 V10 Plus to catch up and cross the line first.

Watch Godzilla Get Annihilated By An Audi R8 V10 Plus
You would think the GT-R has the advantage in a drag race based on its performance figures, but the fact remains that this burly beast weighs 200 kg more than its lighter rival, which allowed the R8 V10 Plus to leave the GT-R for dust. Looks like Godzilla needs to join a gym if it’s to stand a chance next time, though it would be interesting to see how the more powerful Nissan GT-R Nismo would fare in the same scenario.
Watch Godzilla Get Annihilated By An Audi R8 V10 Plus
Watch Godzilla Get Annihilated By An Audi R8 V10 Plus
 via:carbuzz.com

 

Is This Exquisite Black Ferrari Enzo Worth $2.4 Million?

Depends how badly you want one in your collection.
While many will argue that a Ferrari can only look fetching in the manufacturer’s signature Rosso Corsa red paint finish, we’d argue that some models can look just as sleek in black (but definitely not pink). Take this Ferrari Enzo, for example – we think you’ll agree it looks exquisite. Not many exist, either. Only 399 examples of the Ferrari Enzo were produced between 2002 and 2004, but only a handful were coated in Nero black. And now one of them can be yours, as Semco Exclusive Cars, based in Munich, is listing a Nero Ferrari Enzo for sale.
Is This Exquisite Black Ferrari Enzo Worth $2.4 Million?
While it’s undeniably beautiful with only 6,400 miles on the clock, the asking price is extortionate. When the Ferrari Enzo first went on sale, it would typically set you back $670,000, but this Nero example costs a whopping 2.2 million Euros (around $2.4 million). While that may sound steep, it’s comparatively cheap compared to some of the current ludicrous asking prices we’ve seen for the LaFerrari. We’ve also found dealers charging nearly $4 million for a Rosso Corsa Ferrari Enzo in the past. Should you be able to afford it, you will own of one of the fastest road cars ever made for its time, packing a 6.0-liter V12 churning out 651 horsepower and hitting 60 mph in 3.1 seconds and a top speed of 220 mph.
Is This Exquisite Black Ferrari Enzo Worth $2.4 Million?
Is This Exquisite Black Ferrari Enzo Worth $2.4 Million?
Is This Exquisite Black Ferrari Enzo Worth $2.4 Million?
Is This Exquisite Black Ferrari Enzo Worth $2.4 Million?
Is This Exquisite Black Ferrari Enzo Worth $2.4 Million?
Is This Exquisite Black Ferrari Enzo Worth $2.4 Million?
Is This Exquisite Black Ferrari Enzo Worth $2.4 Million?
Is This Exquisite Black Ferrari Enzo Worth $2.4 Million?
Is This Exquisite Black Ferrari Enzo Worth $2.4 Million?
Is This Exquisite Black Ferrari Enzo Worth $2.4 Million?

via : carbuzz.com

Toyota Land Speed Cruiser Breaks Record For Fastest SUV In The World

And Toyota says it could go even faster on a longer runway.
The Toyota Land Cruiser is a reputable SUV, but it isn’t one you associate with speed. That was until last year’s SEMA, when Toyota revealed the heavily modified Land Speed Cruiser. Forget off-roading because, as the name suggests, the Land Speed Cruiser was designed for one sole purpose: to go faster than any SUV before it, thanks to its insane 2,000-horsepower V8. Now the Toyota Land Speed Cruiser can officially be declared as the “World’s Fastest SUV” after reaching a record-breaking speed of 230 mph.
Toyota Land Speed Cruiser Breaks Record For Fastest SUV In The World
Behind the wheel of the Land Speed Cruiser was former Toyota NASCAR driver Carl Edwards, who achieved a GPS-verified speed of 230.03 mph on the 2.5-mile runway at the Mojave Air and Space Port in Mojave, California.
The Land Speed Cruiser started out as a stock SUV before being heavily modified by a team of engineers at Toyota’s Motorsports Technical Center.

Toyota Land Speed Cruiser Breaks Record For Fastest SUV In The World
Using the standard 5.7-liter 3UR-FE V8 engine as a starting point, they added a pair of volleyball-sized Garrett turbocharged capable of producing up to 55 PSI of boost. Such extreme force induction required sturdier pistons and rods and a custom-made intake manifold fitted to the engine internals. A custom racing transmission was also fitted to cope with the extreme power. Of course, you can’t make such extreme modifications to the engine and expect the Land Speed Cruiser to still be drivable. To improve the aerodynamics, stability, and controllability, the SUV was lowered significantly, and the frame was narrowed by three inches to allow wider Michelin Pilot Super Sport tires to be fitted.
Toyota Land Speed Cruiser Breaks Record For Fastest SUV In The World
On its first run, Edwards hit 211 mph matching the previous record. Hoping to beat the record, engineers increased the boost and the Land Speed Cruiser hit 230.03 mph before it ran out of runway. “At 225 mph, the thing was wandering a little bit,” said Edwards. “All I could think was that Craig said, ‘No matter what, just keep your foot in it,’ and we got 230 mph. It’s safe to say that this is the fastest SUV on the planet.” You would think, then, that the team would be satisfied with that title, but Toyota says that the Land Speed Cruiser could go even faster on a longer track.
Toyota Land Speed Cruiser Breaks Record For Fastest SUV In The World
Toyota Land Speed Cruiser Breaks Record For Fastest SUV In The World